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  • Tamron announces 28-75mm f/2.8 for full-frame Sony mirrorless cameras: quiet AF, high-quality bokeh, weather-sealed

    If you’d like to pair your full-frame Sony mirrorless camera with a 28-75mm f/2 lens from Tamron, you’ll soon have a chance to do it. Tamron has announced that they are developing a fast standard zoom lens: the 28-75mm F/2.8 Di III RXD (Model A036), intended for full frame Sony E-mount cameras. They promise high-quality […]

    The post Tamron announces 28-75mm f/2.8 for full-frame Sony mirrorless cameras: quiet AF, high-quality bokeh, weather-sealed appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • The new Pentax K-1 Mark II adds pixel shift without a tripod and shoots up to ISO 819,200

    Pentax shooters waited for the original Pentax K-1 with great anticipation. After a few delays and issues, though, it was finally released in 2016. A full frame 36MP CMOS sensor, 5-axis in-body image stabilisation, an articulating LCD and build as solidly as one would hope from a pro body. Now, though, the K-1 Mark II is […]

    The post The new Pentax K-1 Mark II adds pixel shift without a tripod and shoots up to ISO 819,200 appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • Photographer captures Trump’s cue card reminding him to be sympathetic to shooting survivors

    It’s nothing new that politicians use notes and cue cards when giving speeches. But a recent AP photo shows that Donald Trump uses notes that remind him to be sympathetic. AP photographer Carolyn Kaster managed to capture the notes president Trump used when meeting people impacted by the mass school shootings across the US. The […]

    The post Photographer captures Trump’s cue card reminding him to be sympathetic to shooting survivors appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • 6 Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls

    Waterfalls are some of the most beautiful natural features you will ever get the chance to photograph and are a very popular subject for landscape photographers. Photographing waterfalls provides a great way to get outdoors and explore nature.

     Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls

    There is something magical about the patterns and sounds of flowing water that really heighten your senses and make you feel at one with nature. Although waterfalls look great, you may be wondering well how do I photograph them? Here are six tips to help you on your way.

    1 – Get the right equipment

    You will be better equipped to photograph waterfalls if you have the right equipment. A wide-angle lens is essential to broaden the angle of view and ensure you are able to photograph the whole waterfall. You will also be able to get up close to the falls rather than photographing them from a distance.

    Once you have found a great waterfall and have the right equipment to capture it, you are ready to take some photographs.

    6 Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls

    2 – Experiment with different shutter speeds

    So now that you have the gear, how do you take photos that capture the authenticity and beauty of the scene?

    When photographing waterfalls, finding the ideal shutter speed involves a lot of experimenting. This step is all about trial and error, which is part of the fun. Try taking shots with different shutter speeds and check out the results to see the differences.


    I would recommend taking pictures with both fast and slow shutter speeds ranging from between 1/500th of a second to a few seconds and see which style of image you prefer.

    3 – Freeze motion

    How you shoot waterfalls effectively depends on the look and feel of the image you are trying to achieve. If you want to capture the water in a static way, you will need to choose a fast shutter speed to freeze the motion of the water. This isolates the water in motion and gives a very different result to using an extended shutter speed.

    See the difference between the three images below and how the change in shutter speed affects the water. (Images courtesy of dPS Managing Editor, Darlene Hildebrandt)

    ISO 100, f/4, no ND filter, 1/640th of a second.

    ISO 100, F/22, o.3 sec with ND filter

    ISO 100, F/22, 1.3 sec with ND filter

    4 – Blur motion

    Using a slow shutter speed will help you to capture the water’s movement. You will find that the longer the shutter is open, the smoother the water will be. Be careful not to use a shutter speed that is too slow if the water is very fast flowing as the water may become one large white mass without any definition.

    6 Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls

    Generally, you will obtain better results by using an extremely slow shutter speed of over a second. However, this will not be possible if you are hand holding the camera due to excessive camera shake, which brings us to the next tip.

    5 – Use a tripod

    Investing in a tripod will help to keep the camera more stable and enhance your chances of getting good images. The main advantage of using a tripod is that you are more likely to capture images of waterfalls that are sharper as the camera is less prone to movement during slower exposures.

    Using a tripod will allow you to use slower shutter speeds to give you a smoother look and feel to your waterfall images. Images captured using long shutter speeds tend to look more dramatic and the silky water looks more appealing and pleasing to the eye.

    If you do not have a tripod, you could set your camera on a stone or some other object to capture part or all of the waterfall.

    6 Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls

    6 – Use a polarizing filter

    One of the best ways to add some color to your images is to use a polarizing filter. This is a great way to deepen colors by increasing their saturation. But be aware that the polarizer also cuts the amount of light entering the camera, and thus increases your exposure by up to two stops of light.

    6 Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls

    Polarizers also help to eliminate glare and reflections from the surface of the water and can be used to increase contrast. This is especially true when shooting during the day in bright conditions.

    When adding a polarizer, the water you capture should become blurred, depending on how fast it is flowing. The advantage to using a polarizer is that you can increase the exposure time and slow the shutter speed, as the amount of light going through the lens is decreased. This allows you to create images with motion and silky-smooth water action.

    Your turn

    With these practical tips, it’s time for you to get out there and start photographing your next waterfall!

    The post 6 Tips for How to Photograph Waterfalls by Jeremy Flint appeared first on Digital Photography School.


    Source: DP School

  • Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    Avoid photographing towards the sun is one of the most common tips you’ll hear for landscape photography. In fact, it’s a tip that I’ve shared previously myself.

    While it’s not without a reason that’s it’s a well-known tip, it might not be as relevant today as it was several years ago. Today’s sensors and post-processing opportunities are much more forgiving and what once was a bad idea can now be an opportunity.

    In this article, I’ll show you how including the sun in the frame can enhance the atmosphere and add an extra dimension to your images as well as sharing my best tips for doing so.

    Why you should include the sun in your images

    I’m sure that many of you are ready to jump straight into the comment section right now and tell me how much of a bad idea it is to shoot towards the sun. But give me a minute to explain a few reasons why it’s something you might want to consider doing with your landscape photography.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    The greatest benefit of adding the sun in the frame is that it adds depth to the image. Take the image above as an example. Remove the sun and the image becomes flat and much less interesting. With the sun included, the image comes to life and drags you into it.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    Compositionally it can also be beneficial. Of course, this depends on where you place the sun. In the example above, the bright sun serves as a focal point. Naturally, the viewer’s eye is guided along the cliffs and up towards the bright area.

    Keep in mind that our eyes are naturally attracted to the brighter parts of the image.

    Another benefit of shooting towards the sun is that you often get beautiful shadows striking towards you. This serves as additional leading lines and benefits the composition.

    Tips for including the sun in your images

    Now, there’s one thing I need to make clear; including the sun in an image won’t always be beneficial. There are certain conditions or methods you should take advantage of for this to work. Here are some tips.

    The time of day matters

    While there are exceptions, the best images come when the sun is low on the horizon. The sun then creates a soft glow and gives a nicely balanced light.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    During midday when the sun is positioned higher in the sky, the light is harsh and less pleasing to the eyes. Generally, this is something you want to avoid.

    Consider the sun’s placement within the frame

    I’ll start by saying this, there’s no one single correct spot to place the sun within your image. Sometimes it’s beneficial to place it in the center, while other times it’s better to place it on the side.

    This is where trial and error, and experience come into play.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    In the image above, I chose to place the sun at the very edge of the frame. Partly obscured by the clouds, it doesn’t take too much attention but instead, you’re drawn to the beautiful light hitting the landscape.

    If you are familiar with semi-advanced post-processing techniques, you might be aware of a processing style called light bleed. This is a technique that involves heavy dodging and enhancing/creating a light source that strikes through the image. However, this is an effect you’re able to get in-camera as well by placing the sun at the corner or edge of your frame.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    Other times, you want to place the sun in the center of the image. In the image above, placing the sun in the center adds a light source that your eyes naturally go toward. Had I instead placed the sun to the side, this image would be less balanced.

    Obscure the sun

    In my opinion, one of the most efficient ways of including the sun in your image is by partly obscuring it. Combining that with a narrow aperture, you get a nice sun-star or sunburst.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    Use a Graduated ND Filter

    Since the sun is so much brighter than the surrounding landscape, it can be hard to capture a well-exposed image when including it in the frame. By using a Graduated ND Filter you’re able to darken the sky in your image – meaning that you can capture a well-balanced image even with the sun in the frame.

    Unfortunately, a Graduated ND Filter is not always ideal. Since the transition between darkened and transparent parts of the filter is a straight line, it can create some unwanted effects if you’re photographing a scene where something is projecting above the horizon.

    Graduated ND Filters are better to use when the horizon is flat, such as the image below:

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    … Or bracket multiple exposures

    Another more flexible method of capturing well-balanced images with the sun included is to bracket multiple exposures and blend them in a photo editor. This is the better choice when the sun is at the highest position in the sky, as the contrast is even greater.

    For the image below, I captured three images; one exposed for the landscape, one exposed for the sky and one even darker to balance out the brightest parts.

    Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

    Your turn

    Hopefully, I’ve been able to convince you that shooting towards the sun isn’t a complete no-no anymore. Have you captured any images that are shot towards the sun for your landscape photography? I would love to see them in a comment below!

    The post Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun by Christian Hoiberg appeared first on Digital Photography School.


    Source: DP School

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