Contact : +91 8939148844

Klachak Blog

  • Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    In this article, you will get five simple exercises to help you improve your photography.

    How to grow as a photographer

    Everyone, from beginners to professionals, seeks to improve their photography. Yet we often struggle to do just that, repeatedly asking the question, “How do I actively move my photography forward?

    macro photography flower - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    Learning to take top-notch photographs isn’t like learning a musical instrument, where you can practice fingerings and scales while slowly gaining skills. When it comes to improving photography, the path often seems nebulous, difficult to grasp.

    It doesn’t have to be this way. There are more focused ways of improving your photography. Below, I discuss five of these exercises, which, if done consistently, will help you improve your photography by leaps and bounds.

    Exercise #1: Photograph every day for a month

    The first exercise is simple; photograph every day. This may sound easy, but it often isn’t. With a job and family and life, it’s surprisingly difficult to get out and do photography.

    But I’d like to emphasize this, if you’re serious about improving your photography, start here. Make sure that you use your camera each day, even if you only take one image. Carve out a particular time of the day that works. Or, if it’s easier for you, carry a camera around in your purse/backpack/briefcase, and bring it out during your lunch break.

    macro photography flower abstract - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    I’ve found that there’s a sort of magic that comes from photographing—not just consistently—but daily. Your camera becomes a familiar tool in your hands. You start to see compositions everywhere. The photographic medium starts to make sense.

    Trust me, if you do this your work will improve fast.

    Exercise #2: Make 10 unique images of one subject

    One of the main barriers to photographic improvement is not the technique so much as it is the ability to see.

    A great photographer often views a subject and starts to visualize the many possibilities, quickly rejecting those which won’t work, and selecting that which does.

    macro photography flower abstract aster - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    Hence, choose a subject and start by taking the obvious photographs.

    Then, rather than moving on, force yourself to look for more. Get in close and take some more abstract or detail shots. Move back and look for more environmental images. Alter the background, the angle, and/or the lighting. If you normally use a tripod, try working handheld, or vice versa.

    macro photography flower aster abstract - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    This exercise is meant to improve your ability to see. It is meant to take you out of your comfort zone so that you go beyond the obvious, and start looking deeper at your subject. Once that is ingrained, the photographic possibilities begin to open up, and your images will become unique and more satisfying.

    macro photography flower abstract aster - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    Exercise #3: Share only one image per week

    Let me explain this one. Part of improving one’s photography involves becoming a better self-critic. If you cannot recognize where you need to improve, then it’s very difficult to improve at all. But if you can pinpoint your strengths and your weaknesses, then you can improve upon the weaknesses—and harness your strengths.

    To this end, I recommend joining a photo sharing site, one that is geared towards photography. Flickr, 500PX, and Tumblr would work well (or the dPS Facebook group). Then post one, and only one, image per week. Make sure that you’ve looked through your recent work, and that the image that you’re sharing is your best.

    Before posting, think to yourself, “What is it that makes this a strong image? What would make it better? And what was it that made me reject the other images in favor of this one?” Take note of your responses, and remember them the next time you’re out in the field.

    macro photography flower coneflower - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    So why can’t you just do this privately, rather than posting to a photo sharing site?

    I find that there’s a bit of pressure that comes from posting your pictures publicly. This forces you to work slightly harder in identifying your best images. However, if you would strongly prefer not to post your images publicly, you could adjust the settings on your chosen sharing site so that only you can view the images—but imagine that you’re assembling them for a gallery showing.

    Exercise #4: Critique at least 10 images per week

    Similar to Exercise #3, but with a slightly different focus. Learning to critique your own work is great, but it’s also important to look at a broad array of photography with a critical eye. Hence, join a photo critique forum, and critique at least 10 images per week.

    There are a number of forums out there that I recommend for nature photographers like myself: Naturescapes, Nature Photographers Network, and Birdphotographers.net are all good ones. They should allow you to make a free account in order to comment on other images.

    macro photography flower abstract pink - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    This will help you in a few ways. First, constantly looking at images will help you to internalize compositions and get a sense of what works and what doesn’t. It’s difficult to improve your own photography if you don’t have a sense of what good photography looks like.

    Second, it may give you ideas for your own photography. By this, I don’t mean that you copy other people’s photographs directly. But you can take note of interesting techniques, camera settings, and compositions, and incorporate them into your own work.

    Third, being forced to articulate, in writing, what you find pleasing about an image will go a long way toward being able to understand how to make your own images more pleasing.

    Notice that I’m not telling you to post your images on the critique forum—but if you feel confident enough to do so, then that is an excellent way to improve as well.

    Exercise #5: Work in another genre of photography

    This exercise is for those who would self-identify as intermediate or advanced photographers. Early on in your photographic journey, I would recommend focusing on a single genre and improving within that genre.

    street photography ann arbor nickels arcade - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    I took a break from macro photography to work on my street photography skills.

    However, once you have a decent amount of experience, I find that it is really beneficial to get out of your comfort zone by working on another photographic genre (the more different, the better!). Stick with this genre for an entire month.

    street photography ann arbor - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    This forces you to expand your photographic eye and think in new ways. It can often generate unique ideas that you can apply to your primary area of photography. And when the month is up and you switch back to your favored type of photography, you’ll likely find that you’ll be seeing the world in a whole new light.

    ann arbor street photography - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    In conclusion…

    If you’re seeking to improve your photography, follow the exercises discussed above.

    If you photograph every day, focus on expanding your photographic eye, look at numerous images and learn to critique your own, and expand your photographic horizons—you will soon be on your way to a higher level of photography. I wish you the best of luck!

    macro photography flower abstract tulip - Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

    Have any exercises that you’ve found useful for photographic improvement? Share them in the comments!

    The post Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School.


    Source: DP School

  • Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    A Lensbaby lens is a dream come true for artistic, creative, and ground-breaking photographers. A company made famous by their innovative effect lenses and optics, Lensbaby has captivated the industry for nearly 14 years. This company’s newest pride and joy is the Lensbaby Burnside 35, an f/2.8 lens that is unlike any other in their arsenal.

    Swirly Bokeh

    The Burnside 35 features the iconic “swirly bokeh” that Lensbaby is famous for. This effect is seemingly influenced by the Petzval objective which causes a swirly bokeh and vignette, and it is created by pairing two doublet lenses with an aperture stop in between.

    The first lens corrects spherical aberrations and the second lens corrects for astigmatism. However, the pairing creates the swirly distortion that we all love.

    You can adjust the intensity of the swirly bokeh by changing the aperture: f/2.8 will be most intense, while something like an f/16 won’t have any swirl at all. The thing that I find most compelling about Lensbaby is the fact that all of the effects are in-camera/in-lens, hence saving you a lot of time on the editing front.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    Built-in vignetting

    I was very intrigued to stumble upon this lens, as it has a feature I have never before seen in any other – a built-in vignette slider. Instead of needing to darken the edges of your photograph in post-processing, you can do an in-camera effect and save yourself the editing trouble.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    It’s a manual lens

    That being said, much like other lenses in the Lensbaby collection, this one is fully manual. The aperture is adjusted by rotating the aperture cuff at the very back of the lens rather than in the camera as is common for other lenses. The vignette slider is located near the cuff on the opposite side of the lens.

    When rotating either the vignette slider or the aperture ring, you can feel each stop as there feels to be a minor indent that pops into place – a welcome feeling when wanting to make quick adjustments without looking up from the lens.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    The focus is also manual, which may cause a bit of a learning curve for photographers that rely heavily on autofocus. However, I found that it was rather easy to see when the focus was captured or not and I was able to become proficient in a matter of a half hour.

    Keeping the fully manual aspect of the lens in mind, this may not be the right piece of equipment for fast-paced action shooting. That being said, the artistic look of Lensbaby Burnside 35 can even make out of focus images look intentionally fuzzy (although any stylistic choice should look intentional, not as a mistake).

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    Build

    The lens’s build feels incredibly sturdy (it’s made of metal) and it is visually striking. Though I’d consider the lens fairly light in comparison to other 35mm lenses, it is still a significant weight that adds to the impression of a very sturdy build.

    The lens does not come with a case, and I’d highly recommend one. Despite a sturdy build, a good bump could crack something, and that’s not a risk worth taking.

    The metal front lens cap is easy to slide on and off but holds very tight when it’s on; exactly how you’d want it to be. The rear mounting cap is equivalent to all the ones I’ve seen from other lenses. The box comes with a user guide with tips and tricks on how to get the most out of your lens, a welcome addition to any lens purchase.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    The vignette slider in action

    The vignette slider makes a significant, visual difference in the image. It’s great to be able to see right-off-the-bat how the image will look at the various vignette stops. As well, from a purely aesthetic perspective, it can be rather fun to watch the vignette open and close on the glass itself – it’s a bit like a reptilian creature blinking.

    Do keep in mind that the frame will darken significantly when the vignette slider is set at its most closed point. As such, I actually found myself using the vignette slider almost like a neutral density filter to bring out the colors of a very bright sky.

    The versatility of this lens is also notable enough to bring up. You are certainly not obligated to photograph at a low aperture number and a shallow depth of field, when bumping the aperture up to f/16, architectural photographs are exceptional at the 35mm focal length. Add the vignette slider and you have a dramatic image worthy of any gallery.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    The vignette slider at the dark end of the scale.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    The vignette slider at the light end of the scale.

    Overall

    This 35mm lens is nice and wide and can focus up to 6 inches away from the glass itself, excellent for macro photography. There isn’t much distortion on the subject that is in focus in the center, which is much appreciated.

    Compatible with both full-frame cameras and crop sensors, I tested the Burnside 35 on my Canon 5D Mark IV (full-frame) and Canon 7D Mark II (crop sensor) to see how well it performed. I was brilliantly satisfied with its abilities for both, though it was clear to see that the full-frame yielded even more fantastic results than the crop sensor.

    It’s worth mentioning that I was exceptionally pleased with how fluid the manual focus was as well as the vignette slider, both moved with ease and can be adjusted with just one or two fingers! This lens is exceptionally sharp when the focus is right, making sure that whatever you want to be the subject is very clear.

    The equipment is small and easy to carry, another welcome sight in lenses.

    Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens

    At a retail price of $499.99 (available now), the Lensbaby Burnside 35 is worth every penny if I do say so myself. The Burnside 35 is available in the following mounts: Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony E, Sony Alpha A, Fuji X, Micro 4/3, Pentax K, and Samsung NX.

    The post Review of the Lensbaby Burnside 35 Special Effects Lens appeared first on Digital Photography School.


    Source: DP School

  • When a Polar Bear wants to be a wildlife photographer

    The number of people who get to photograph is not huge, but the number of people who get to see a Polar Bear actually using a camera is close to zero. Photographer Roie Galitz was leading a photography workshop in Svalbard when the team encountered a big male Polar Bear. Little did they know that the […]

    The post When a Polar Bear wants to be a wildlife photographer appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • Signili Review – Invisible Digital Watermark to Protect Your Photos from Copyright Infringement

    If you share your photography online, you know that your images will be re-distributed and re-published without your permission. If you are a professional photographer, or a photo enthusiast, you probably also realize that rampant online copyright infringement costs creative professionals a significant amount of lost revenue – every image that is published without a […]

    The post Signili Review – Invisible Digital Watermark to Protect Your Photos from Copyright Infringement appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • What are V-lock batteries and should you be using them?

    As a video shooter, I have needs and one of the big ones is power. Shooting 4K video and RAW video requires a LOT of juice and very often I am powering more than just a camera. I could have microphones that are pulling power from the camera battery. I could also have external monitors, […]

    The post What are V-lock batteries and should you be using them? appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

Items 1481 to 1485 of 2461 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 295
  4. 296
  5. 297
  6. 298
  7. 299
  8. ...
  9. 493