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  • For the first time in years, camera and lens production actually increased in 2017

    Well, this is a pleasant surprise. For the first time in a long time, camera and lens production and sales has gone up! Seeing an overall 8% increase in cameras and 2% lenses. Sure, not massive amounts, but compared to a 33% drop from 2015 to 2016, that’s mighty impressive. Of course, there have been a whole […]

    The post For the first time in years, camera and lens production actually increased in 2017 appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • This Canon G7X II vs iPhone X comparison tests to see if phones really can replace compact cameras

    There is no doubt that increases in smartphone camera technology has made a huge dent in the sales of compact cameras. Compact cameras, also known as point and shoots, vary wildly from very low end to fairly high. And for stills photography, there’s no doubt that most of the current top smartphones can easily keep […]

    The post This Canon G7X II vs iPhone X comparison tests to see if phones really can replace compact cameras appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • Getting Started with Landscape Photography – 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    One of the things I like most about photography is that there is always more to learn. It keeps the mind active and the creative juices flowing. But the wealth of information out there can be overwhelming for beginners in landscape photography. Where do you start?

    There are a few easy things you can do that will have an immediate impact on your photography so you can start making better images right away. Let’s focus on those and leave the more technical stuff for later.

    1. Pay attention to the light

    There is no such thing as bad light. The key is to understand what kinds of images are suitable under various lighting conditions.

    Red Rock State Park, Arizona by Anne McKinnell - Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    During golden hour, the day’s last light makes the rocks glow.

    The Golden Hour

    This is the time right after sunrise and right before sunset when the sun is low in the sky and casts beautiful golden light. Start here! It’s hard to go wrong with golden light, which is the most popular time of day for photography.

    Ajo, Arizona by Anne McKinnell - Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    The cactus in the foreground is in the shade while golden hour light reflects off the mountain in the background.

    Bright Midday Light

    The opposite of golden hour, the harsh direct light you find at midday can be the most difficult to work with – unless you photograph in the shade.

    Just look for interesting subjects that are in the shade and leave the sky out of the frame. The even soft light is great for close-ups and flower photography.

    Bush Lupin - Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    Flowers photographed in the shade.

    There are more types of light to work with and different times of day to photograph, but start with these for the quickest results.

    2. Remove distractions

    Pay attention to the things in the background of your images and try to simplify the background as much as possible. Sometimes there is an unwanted object, like a trash can for example, that you might not notice unless you are looking for it. These things can often be hidden behind your main subject simply by moving to one side, photographing from a higher or lower perspective, or getting closer.

    Try to simplify your composition as much as possible with fewer items in your scene. Find a way to photograph your main subject on a clean background.

    Big surf on the Oregon Coast. Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    To make this image, I had to change my perspective to eliminate debris on the sand as well as other rocks and birds from the frame.

    Beware of tree branches or other things that poke in to the edge of your frame. Before you take your shot, try to remember to do an “edge check”. Look around the edges of your frame and make sure it looks clean.

    3. Look for one thing

    Your photograph cannot be about everything. You need to decide what is most interesting in your scene and make your photograph about that. Get closer to it.

    One exercise that will get you in this habit is to go on a photo walk with the purpose of looking for one particular element of design. You’ll find that when you set your mind on one thing, you’ll start to see it everywhere. Here are some ideas to get you started:

    Textures and Patterns

    Often beginning photographers will try to capture an entire vista in one photograph and don’t notice the details. But the more you train your eye to notice the details, the more interesting your photographs will become.

    The best thing about photographing textures and patterns is that you don’t have to go far to find them. Your subject can be anything from rocks to grass or peeling paint. I’m sure you can find subjects with wonderful textures close to home. Try to fill your frame with the pattern.

    Weston Beach, Point Lobos State Reserve, California - Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    Filling the frame with the pattern of colorful rocks.

    Lines

    Look for horizontal lines, vertical lines or diagonal lines. Try to find lines that lead the way to some interesting subject.

    Colors

    Take a look at the color wheel and notice complementary colors. Those are the ones that are opposites on the wheel such as blue and orange, red and green, or yellow and purple. Any scene with complementary colors is always striking (which is why so many photographers carry around a red umbrella or a red jacket for their partner to wear in a grassy or forest scene).

    Bamboo Forest - Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    Complementary colors plus diagonal lines.

    4. Make time to practice

    It doesn’t take long to develop good habits and learn what makes an interesting photograph. But it can be hard to remember if you only go shooting once in awhile. Try to make a habit of doing it every day, even if it’s only for fifteen minutes. By doing this, you’ll reinforce the habit and find yourself seeing the potential for great images all around you all the time.

    Spider Rock, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona - Getting Started with Landscape Photography - 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

    Golden hour – there is still enough light to photograph the depths of the canyon while the last of the day’s light reflects off the top of the highest rock.

    Conclusion

    There are more technical things that you’ll want to start learning soon such as; how the exposure triangle works, understanding depth of field, picking the right shooting mode, focus settings, and more. It’s endless (which is a good thing).

    But for now, these tips will get you on the right track so you are happy with your images right from the beginning. Have fun!

    The post Getting Started with Landscape Photography – 4 Easy Tips for Beginners by Anne McKinnell appeared first on Digital Photography School.


    Source: DP School

  • Kendrick Lamar bans pro photographers from his concerts, only fans can take photos

    More and more performers are trying to ban smartphones during their concerts and only allow professional photographers to take the shots. However, Kendrick Lamar is taking a different route. He will not ban his fans from using smartphones at his shows – but there will be no professional photographers allowed. The initial reports stated that […]

    The post Kendrick Lamar bans pro photographers from his concerts, only fans can take photos appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • 5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    There are different schools of thought when it comes to black and white photography. Some believe it was a technical limitation of the past that you need to get over and move on. While others see it as a creative choice, that needs to be explored in great depths.

    As camera technology gets better, with more emphasis on improved color ranges, why would you choose to shoot or process your images in black and white? In this article, we’ll look at five reasons why you might want to shoot or convert your images to black and white.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    1. B&W Helps you see differently

    The old “Masters” of photography shot in black and white initially, because they had no choice. Even with the advent of Kodachrome, which introduced the world to color photography, there was still a pursuance of black and white. This was because black and white was (and still is by some people) seen as photography in its the purest form.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    When you remove color the emphasis shifts to the other compositional elements of the image. These include lines, shape and texture, contrasts and tones.

    With this in mind, it is obvious that not all images will translate well to black and white. So, look at all the elements and deduce what else you have to work with, besides color.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    Many times black and white helps you develop a different perspective from what you are used to seeing, which nurtures your photographic eye.

    2. B&W Eliminates distractions

    You are used to seeing the world in color and there nothing is wrong with that view. Sometimes this contributes to other elements or details being lost or taken for granted. Some of the elements (highlighted before) required for a great photo include contrast, texture, lighting, shape, and form.

    When you shoot for black and white, you challenge yourself to remove the distraction of color. These include color casts and differences in color temperature (ambient light sources), as well as specific colorful elements that are strong, which may reside in the background or take away from your story.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    Monochromatic imagery forces you to focus on form, shape, and texture while composing. If your emphasis is on making colors work together, these elements are sometimes overlooked. With black and white, distracting colors are now translated into shades of gray that add to your image.

    3. B&W Offers creative choice

    Since your world is in color, it is safe to say that color photography depicts reality and is more realistic. Thus, black and white photography is viewed as a rendition of reality – or how you interpret what you see.

    When you remove color, you not only isolate the different elements, you are compelled to find how they relate to each other. This helps you explore and create different ways to tell your story.

    When you take away color, you remove what your viewer is used to seeing. Now you are charged with finding the stronger elements in the scene and figuring out how to use them to convey what you want to depict.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    4. Adds emotion or mood

    Something about the variance of tonal ranges, rich blacks, and deep contrasts appeal to us psychologically. It creates a connection that makes you stop and pay attention to what is being presented.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    Many photographers use black and white for storytelling in travel and street photography, as well as when portraying religious or cultural activities. Monochrome in some genres connects, enhances and strengthens emotions and mood.

    5. Timelessness

    Even though this is lower on the list, it is one of the more common reasons why some photographers shoot in black and white. Monochromatic photography adds what is seen as a timeless quality to your images.

    Black and white photos seem to transcend reality and take you back to a time gone by. Historically there were color schemes that were specific to types of film or trends in digital photography that can date your image. The removal of color makes it tougher to figure out when the image was taken/produced.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    Bonus

    You no longer have to imagine what your scene will look like in black and white, as current camera technology allows you to try this on the spot and see if it works. While some photographers prefer to shoot in black and white, others prefer to shoot in color and then process or convert their images to black and white to get a different or better tonal range.

    Note: If you shoot RAW format and set your camera to its version of the monochrome setting, you will see a black and white preview on the LCD when you review your images. But you will still have all the color data available in the RAW file at the post-processing stage. This gives you the best of both worlds – a quick b/w preview and ability to convert later.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    This image was shot in black and white using the camera’s monochrome settting.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography

    This image was shot in color and then converted to black and white in the processing stage.

    Conclusion

    While black and white photography still has an important role in photography, please note that not all subjects translate well to this mode. Even though a strong composition is not color dependent, sometimes the power of the photo is its color. This is why it is good to know when to use black and white.

    5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography
    If you are interested in pursuing the monochromatic, look for the other elements of composition like texture, shape, form, lines, and contrast. Experiment with shooting and processing black and white images and figure out which resonates with you more.

    The post 5 Reasons Why You Might Want to Try Black and White Photography by Nisha Ramroop appeared first on Digital Photography School.


    Source: DP School

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