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  • Canon’s upcoming high resolution “EOS Rs” mirrorless camera may come with IBIS

    One of the biggest grips about the original Canon EOS R and the EOS RP mirrorless cameras, along with only one card slot and the 4K crop, was the lack of in-body image stabilisation (IBIS). Canon’s word on the subject was basically that they didn’t feel their IBIS tech was at a point yet where […]

    The post Canon’s upcoming high resolution “EOS Rs” mirrorless camera may come with IBIS appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • News: Capture One 20 Release – A New Version of the Powerful RAW Editor

    The post News: Capture One 20 Release – A New Version of the Powerful RAW Editor appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

    capture-one-20-release

    Phase One has just released the next version in their Capture One software lineup, which will replace the old Capture One 12, and will undoubtedly maintain Phase One’s position as a high-end Lightroom alternative.

    Capture One 20 promises the same set of tools as Capture One 12, but better (and with a few extra functions that you’ll want to check out).

    Let’s take a look at some of the improvements from Capture One 12 to Capture One 20:

    First, Capture One 20 features upgraded color editing tools, so that it’s possible to make selective color adjustments on the fly. Capture One 12 was already known for its selective color tools, but Capture One 20 offers speedier adjustments and increased functionality.

    Second, Capture One 20 includes a new high dynamic range tool, which will allow for improved contrast adjustments. As Phase One promises: “Recover highlights, boost shadows, darken the blacks or boost the brightest areas of your photo – all in one tool.” While you’ll want to try this HDR tool to determine how valuable it is for your workflow, it could certainly come in handy for plenty of photographers.

    Third, every photographer, beginner and professional alike, jumps at the chance to use top-of-the-line noise reduction algorithms. Capture One 20 developers have clearly kept this in mind, offering an enhanced noise reduction tool for noise-free photos at higher ISOs.

    One of the reasons why you might consider Capture One over Lightroom is the layer and masking functions. These make it possible to produce local adjustments and carry out advanced editing. Fortunately, Capture One 20 has continued to develop these features, adding a new Copy function that will make working with masks and layers even easier.

    Now, Capture One 20’s most obvious weakness is its price, which remains far above that of many other Lightroom alternatives. But the additional power and customizability may be worth it, especially for experienced enthusiasts and professionals.

    Plus, for those who already own Capture One 12, Phase One promises a lower rate if you decide to upgrade to Capture One 20. And Capture One can also be purchased as part of a subscription package; for those who are on a subscription plan, head over to the Capture One website to download your new Capture One 20 software.

    For everyone else, you can purchase a Capture One license or subscription, or you can try the software for free!

    Do you plan on getting Capture One 20? And what do you think about Capture One compared to Lightroom? Share your thoughts in the comments!

    capture-one-20-release

    The post News: Capture One 20 Release – A New Version of the Powerful RAW Editor appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.


    Source: DP School

  • Did Instagram hide ‘likes’ just to fuel your posting addiction?

    While some may argue that Instagram’s test of hiding like counts is aiming to take the pressure of posting, a new report suggests that the real reason behind this move is to get you to spend more with the app. A recent report by CNBC suggests that the reason behind Facebook’s Instagram’s recent test is not […]

    The post Did Instagram hide ‘likes’ just to fuel your posting addiction? appeared first on DIY Photography.


    Source: Diyphotographynet

  • Important Things to Consider When Photographing Winter Scenes

    The post Important Things to Consider When Photographing Winter Scenes appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jeremy Flint.

    photographing-winter-scenes

    Winter is a great season for photography and a magical time of year to be outdoors. Photographing winter scenes can be an exciting opportunity to capture some unique and wonderful images, particularly when a familiar scene is covered in a blanket of snow and takes on an entirely different perspective. Here are some considerations on how to photograph winter scenes:

    1. Make the most of winter’s longer dusks and dawns

    In spite of the colder temperatures, one of the joys of winter is that the sun tends to linger longer at dusk and dawn. It also remains lower in the sky throughout the day, providing great light.

    If you can brave the elements and venture outside to capture these magical moments during the winter, you are more likely to have a productive shoot and be rewarded for your efforts. One advantage of photographing at dusk and dawn in the winter is that sunrise is much later than in the summer, and sunset is earlier.

    photographing-winter-scenes-01

    Winter landscape, Oxfordshire

    2. Find contrast

    When photographing winter scenes such as snow, there are usually displays of strong contrast between subjects and colors that can make for striking images. For example, the whiteness of snow stands out really well against the darkness of a tree silhouette and combines beautifully with a colorful sun.

    Alternatively, warm winter skies work really well with the cooler tones of snow. Look to find and photograph these types of contrast in your images, and the results will be more visually stunning.

    photographing-winter-scenes-02

    Oxfordshire, England

    3. Shoot bright and colorful scenes

    Make the most of the winter light and shoot brightly-lit scenes. The bright white snow adds a certain beauty to a winter scene and can make a dull subject more interesting. A great time to shoot colorful winter scenes is when the sun is shining.

    Image: Yosemite, USA

    Yosemite, USA

    Seek out colorful vistas that may include an animal, a tree, people, a house, a building, or even a snowman. Capture their warm colors in the glowing light. You may find you will need to overexpose a touch if your pictures are coming out slightly dark to make your images slightly lighter.

    photographing-winter-scenes-04

    Iceland

    4. Bring plenty of batteries

    Batteries tend to lose power and run out faster in colder weather, especially when photographing winter scenes.

    Be sure to fully charge them before you set off to maximize your shooting time and keep spares in a warm place, such as an inner pocket.

    5. Keep warm

    One of the most important challenges with photographing winter scenes is keeping warm. It is amazing how quickly your body temperature can fall when standing still photographing in the cold.

    Wear layers to keep the heat in (thermal and wool base layers work really well). Wrap up warm with gloves and a hat and consider hand (heat) warmers. These are great for heating your hands after they have exposed them to the elements, especially if you have to remove your gloves to navigate the camera buttons when taking photos.

    There are winter gloves designed specifically for photographers. The thumb and forefinger flip back so you can keep your hands warm while photographing. Consider investing in a pair if you will be in snow and cold a lot.

    Also, bring snacks and water to stay energized and hydrated.

    6. How to photograph snow:

    Snow brightens the landscape and makes everything outdoors look amazing. However, photographing snow does come with its challenges. Here are some useful tips worth considering when photographing snow:

    • Setting White Balance to “Cloudy White Balance” or setting your Kelvins to the warmer spectrum will help to make up for the bluish-tinge snow gets. This is particularly evident on overcast or cloudy days when you may get a blue cast to the snow in your images.
    photographing-winter-scenes-05

    Iceland

    • Overexpose when shooting snow so that the snow is white rather than “grey”.

    Snow can trick your camera meter into underexposing when using your camera’s automatic metering system.

    In order to achieve the correct exposure, you will need to compensate for this by adding positive exposure compensation (overexposure) of 1 to 2 stops. The raised exposure value (EV) will help the snow to appear whiter rather than a dull grey. Then your images will be more accurate and a better representation of the snow-covered scene that you see as a result of this.

    This applies whether you are capturing falling snow or after it has settled on the ground.

    Also, consider using a polarizer filter – this can cut glare and reflections off the snow when it is sunny. It can also help you to see through streams of water better because it cuts through the reflections on top of the water.

    Image: Yellowstone, USA

    Yellowstone, USA

    Conclusion

    Winter can be a brilliant season for photography, whether you are capturing photos close to home or at more distant exotic locations. Don’t be deterred by the challenges faced when photographing winter scenes. Get out there and have some fun with your camera this winter, and use these tips to capture some great photos you can be proud of.

    Share your winter images with us below and any further tips you may have.

     

     

    The post Important Things to Consider When Photographing Winter Scenes appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jeremy Flint.


    Source: DP School

  • Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2)

    The post Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2) appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Nisha Ramroop.

    photoshop-adjustment-layers-explained-part-2

    Part 1 of How to Use Photoshop Adjustment Layers introduced you to the first eight of the adjustment layer type editing tools, which allow you to work non-destructively. Here, we continue to look at some of the other tools available as Adjustment Layers.

    Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2)

    1. Photo Filter

    Did you know that there are colored filters that you place in front of your camera lens that alter the color temperature and balance of your final image? Well, the Photo Filter adjustment layer adds a color filter to your image similar to this.

    There are many preset photo filters in Photoshop, but the most common are those that make your image warm or cool. You can further tweak each preset to your liking. For instance, you can change the density of the effect easily using the Density slider. There is also the Preserve Luminosity box to check so that the applied filter does not darken your image.

    You can also choose an exact color that you would like to overlay as a filter by clicking on “color” and chosing from the color menu or by using the eyedropper tool to chose a color from your image.

    Image: Warm (oranges) and Cool (Blues) Photo filters applied to the image above

    Warm (oranges) and Cool (Blues) Photo filters applied to the image above

    2. Channel Mixer

    The Channel Mixer Photoshop Adjustment Layer is another great tool to create stunning black and white and tinted images.

    The principle is similar to that used by the Black and White Adjustment Layer. In each of these, you can adjust the displayed grayscale image by changing the tonal values of the color elements of the image.

    There are three channels in the RGB view: red, green and blue. Note: The source channel is the one that defaults to 100%. The Channel Mixer, therefore, allows you to combine and mix the best of each channel. It does this by adding (or subtracting) grayscale data from your source channel to another channel.

    Also, of note, adding more color to a channel gives you a negative value and vice versa. Hence, at the end of your edit, it is advisable that all your numbers total 100%.

    Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2)

    The Channel Mixer also allows you to exaggerate color and make creative color adjustments to your image.

    3. Color Lookup

    The Color Lookup adjustment layer uses presets to instantly color grade or change the “look” of your image. The presets are called LUTs or lookup tables. Each lookup table contains specific instructions for Photoshop to remap the colors in your image to a different set of colors to create the selected look.

    Image: Applying the Late Sunset LUT creates a dramatic finish

    Applying the Late Sunset LUT creates a dramatic finish

    When you choose the Color Lookup Adjustment Layer, three options are available to you: 3DLUT File, Abstract and Device Link.

    Most of the presets reside under the 3DLUT File option. Of note, 3D (in 3DLUT) refers to Photoshop’s RGB color channels (and not three-dimension).

    Image: Late Sunset LUT applied at 60% opacity for a more realistic finish

    Late Sunset LUT applied at 60% opacity for a more realistic finish

    Furthermore, LUTS are available for download from various websites or you can create your own LUT.

    4. Invert

    The Invert Photoshop Adjustment Layer is self-explanatory. It inverts the colors and is an easy way to make a negative of your image for an interesting effect.

    Image: The first image with colors inverted gives a surreal otherworldly effect

    The first image with colors inverted gives a surreal otherworldly effect

    5. Posterize

    Looking for a flat, poster-like finish? The Posterize Adjustment Layer gives you that by reducing the number of brightness values available in your image.

    You can make an image have as much or as little detail as you like by selecting the number in the levels slider. The higher the number, the more detail your image has. The lower the number, the less detail your image has.

    This can come in handy when you want to screenprint your image. You can limit the tones of black and white. This is also true of the Threshold Adjustment Layer.

    Image: Posterize Adjustment Layer

    Posterize Adjustment Layer

    6. Threshold

    When you select Threshold from your Photoshop Adjustment Layers list, your image changes to black and white. By changing the Threshold Level value, you control the number of pixels that are black or white.

    Image: Threshold Adjustment Layer

    Threshold Adjustment Layer

    7. Gradient Map

    The Gradient Map lets you map different colors to different tones in your image. The gradient fill, therefore, sets the colors representing both the shadow tones on one end and highlight tones on the other end of the gradient.

    Likewise, checking the “Reverse” box swaps around the colors of your gradient. This means that the shadow colors are moved to the highlights end and vice versa.

    A good rule of thumb is to keep your shadows dark and your highlights brighter for ease of reference.

    Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2)

    Your gradient map also makes available many presets that are adjustable via the gradient editor window. Additionally, you can also define/create your own gradients by changing the slider colors.

    8. Selective Color

    Use the Selective Color Adjustment Layer to modify specific amounts of a primary color without modifying other primary colors in your image. Check the Absolute box if you want to adjust the color in absolute values.

    Example: If you have a pixel that is 50% yellow and you add 10%, you are now at a 60% total. The Relative box is a little more complicated as it would adjust the yellow pixel only by the percentage it contributes to the total. Using the same example, if you add 10% to the yellow slider (with relative checked), it actually adds 50% of the 10%, which brings your total to 55%. Relative, therefore, gives you a more subtle effect.

    Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2)

    However, when it comes to this editing tool, the potential is far beyond this simplistic edit technique. You can use it to correct skin tones and for general toning.

    While selective color adjustments are similar to hue/saturation adjustments, there are subtle differences. Selective Color allows you to subtract/add color values, whereas Hue/Saturation does not.

    The Hue/Saturation adjustment allows you to work with a range of hues that are included with the six color ranges in Selective Color, so there is more control there if you need it.

    Conclusion

    These basic examples of how to use the Photoshop Adjustment Layers tools merely scratch the surface of their capabilities. Certainly, you will appreciate editing non-destructively, whether you are just starting out or advanced with adjustment layers.

    Some of the adjustment layers seem similar, but each has its differences and its pros and cons. Either way, there are many possibilities of playing around with your image, while preserving the original.

    If you haven’t already, be sure to check out Part 1 in this series.

    Do you use Photoshop Adjustment Layers? If so, which ones do you use and why? Share with us in the comments.

    The post Photoshop Adjustment Layers Explained and How to Use Them (Part 2) appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Nisha Ramroop.


    Source: DP School

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